Stay away from food aid, politicians told

Top Stories Zimbabwe

Leroy Dzenga

Zimbabwe’s political leadership will not be involved in the distribution of aid in communities, as Government scales up its response to the food insecurity currently being faced by 5,1 million citizens.

Local Government, Public Works and National Housing Minister, July Moyo, said this will ensure impartiality in the distribution of food.

Speaking at an orientation event for Government departments in preparation for the food distribution to people affected by the El Nino induced drought, Minister Moyo said the process should be fair.

“Our people do not have to starve even if we are facing a drought. The critical thing is that there is a selection criteria which has to be professional, non-partisan and targeted at the most vulnerable.

“There are structures in the communities, let us utilise them as laid out in the constitution. Chapter 15 of the constitution says a community is headed by a chief, village head and headman. That is the community, and trying to go outside those structures will be bringing disrepute to Government,” Minister Moyo said.

Chapter 15(1) of the Zimbabwean constitution recognises chiefs, headmen and villages as the official community leadership.

Social welfare and other administering officers were instructed not to allow politicians to hijack the aid rollout.

“We are not going to ask our councillors to participate in this selection, they have an interest and we cannot take away their interest but they will not be involved in the selection,” Minister Moyo explained.

Zimbabwe needs about ZWL$464 million to cover the revised humanitarian appeal and has received ZWL$133 million from aid agencies so far.

The funds are set to cover key areas like food security, education, healthcare and infrastructure rehabilitation.