Call for broadcasters to give children a voice

New Age News Top Stories Zimbabwe

ZTN reporter

Broadcasters and other media houses have been urged to give children a platform to discuss issues that affect them and that are close to their hearts.

The call was made by educationist and African cultural advocate, Dr Benjamin Ganyiwa in an interview with ZTN as the world marked International Children’s Day of Broadcasting on Sunday, March 1.

Dr Ganyiwa said radio and television stations should give children a platform to talk about issues that affect their daily lives, rather than have adults speak on their behalf.

“Children should be given a voice through the media to express, and speak for themselves on issues that affect their day-to-day life.

“We expect the media to give a voice to these voiceless children using the mouthpiece of the nation, which are media houses,” he said.

Dr Ganyiwa said in Africa media houses should give a voice to children on this day to discuss African solutions to African challenges.

He said among other issues, school children can discuss child labour, corporal punishment, the right to education, food, health, child abuse and access to clean water, from their own perspective.

The International Children’s Day of Broadcasting was launched by the United Nations Children’s Fund, UNICEF in 1991 to encourage broadcasters worldwide to create awareness for children’s issues.

Every year, thousands of broadcasters in more than a hundred countries commemorate the day.

Television and radio play a vital role in raising awareness of global issues as well as a critical role in shaping children’s lives. UNICEF urges broadcasters to advance overall child development in their countries by producing documentaries that detail the plight of children, dramas that help break
down gender stereotypes and reduce discrimination and animation that both teaches and entertains.